What is it like being a space journalist?

It’s a job that many space enthusiasts would love: being a space journalist. It allows one to cover exploration of the cosmos and also fulfill an important societal function: popularizing space science. But how does one actually go about become a space journalist? We spoke with Sarah Cruddas, who besides being high-profile space journalist in the United Kingdom has also worked as a broadcaster and just released her new book, The Space Race: The Journey to the Moon and Beyond. She shared with us how her thoughts on the field.


How did you end up becoming a space journalist?

Space journalism was actually a job I invented. My background is in astrophysics, and I previously worked on BBC television in the UK first as a weather presenter and then later as a science correspondent. I decided to leave my then-job to pursue my dreams of space. That’s where the idea of being a space journalist came from – combining my space science skills with my passion for storytelling. The term “space journalism” is getting more popular nowadays and I love seeing people use it.

My goal is simple: inspire as many people as possible to appreciate why space matters.

What are your most and least favorite things about your job?

My favorite thing about my job is that I get to inspire people about why space matters to them. It might not seem like it to everyone now, but exploration of space is the most significant thing we will ever do as a species. We are living in a space age, a world transformed by space. And if we are to continue exploring space, we need to tell great stories about why space matters – because we need to inspire as many people as possible!

As for least favorite thing – admin, definitely admin. Even the glamorous jobs require admin!

To our readers who would like to someday become space journalists, what advice to you have for them?

My advice to anyone – no matter what they want to be – is to simply follow your passion, take educated risks, and work really hard.